I bet 75% of all the cases we look at have some form of employer theft going on. This is a serious problem in Texas. Remember, when the laws are so favorable to the companies, their greed will take over and they will try to get even more. Click this link to find out more.

www.vox.com/2016/3/7/11172330/wage-theft-day-laborers 

 

Contact an attorney today and have them look over your wages to make sure you are not getting taken advantage of.

 

     Today, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling that sided with the State of Texas in attacking the EPA’s ability to place limits on the amounts of mercury, acids, and other toxins may be released from industrial giants. Justice Scalia, writing for the majority, held that the EPA must consider the cost of compliance before deciding whether regulation is appropriate. The ruling is considered a major victory for polluters.

     Almost contemporaneously with the Supreme Court’s decision is this study which has found higher than normal cancer rates in eastern Harris County, i.e., the area around the refineries and other industries that make up the Houston Ship Channel. While the study doesn’t correlate the polluters to the causes of cancer, it is significant.

     This is all very important for workers compensation because in recent years the Texas Supreme Court has made it difficult, if not impossible, to prove in workers compensation proceedings that an occupational disease like cancer is work related. Thanks to the US Supreme Court, polluters have the green light to go on polluting. Hopefully researchers will put more effort into these studies which show higher incidences of cancer in the areas of pollution. These neighborhoods are filled with the workers of these plants. If they can’t get justice before the Division of Workers’ Compensation, hopefully justice will come from somewhere. I grew up near there. I have two aunts who live there. Incidentally, both have had cancer. 

Two things happened this week to raise the consciousness of the public towards the inadequacies of workers compensation. First was a major piece of reporting by Pro Publica and NPR that conducted an exhaustive examination of workers compensation benefits, state by state. You can find the articles here:

www.propublica.org/article/photos-living-through-california-workers-comp-cuts

www.propublica.org/article/the-demolition-of-workers-compensation

The reporters chief findings:

  • Since 2003, legislators in 33 states have passed workers’ comp laws that reduce benefits or make it more difficult for those with certain injuries and diseases to qualify for them.
  • Where a worker gets hurt matters. Because each state has developed its own system, an amputated arm can literally be worth two or three times as much on one side of a state line than the other.
  • Many states, Texas among them, have not only shrunk the payments to injured workers, they’ve also cut them off after an arbitrary time limit — even if workers haven’t recovered.
  • Employers and insurers increasingly control medical decisions, such as whether an injured worker needs surgery.

As a workers compensation attorney who has been practicing since before 2003, I can attest that changes made to Texas’ system that occurred after 2003 were the second such effort to reduce workers compensation benefits and make them more difficult to obtain.

Even though other states made changes to their workers’ compensation schemes in part due to the success Texas has had reducing benefits, most of those states still did not take the more extreme path of reducing benefits to injured workers to the levels that Texas has done. This graphic is illustrative:

 

Texas Benefits Compared to Other States

Those of us representing injured workers have complained for a long time that there is a race to the bottom amongst the states in what is being paid to injured workers. That race is on the verge of breaking the system. The only question is will Republicans in safely gerrymandered districts have the courage to fix the system before it breaks?

The second thing to raise some consciousness was a report put out by OSHA which can be found here:

www.dol.gov/osha/report/20150304-inequality.pdf

That report states another aspect of workers compensation law that has long been complained about by those of us who represent injured workers:

“The costs of workplace injuries are borne primarily by injured workers, their families, and taxpayer-supported components of the social safety net. Changes in statebased workers’ compensation insurance programs have made it increasingly difficult for injured workers to receive the full benefits (including adequate wagereplacement payments and coverage for medical expenses) to which they are entitled. Employers now provide only a small percentage (about 20%) of the overall financial cost of workplace injuries and illnesses through workers’ compensation. This cost-shift has forced injured workers, their families and taxpayers to subsidize the vast majority of the lost income and medical care costs generated by these conditions.”

That is, the public, not the workers’ compensation insurer and not the business that purchases the insurance, bears the primary burden for the costs of injured workers. This occurs through the cost-shifting of workers onto other forms of payment.

I cannot even begin to count the number of times I have heard adjusters state that a workers isn’t being disenfranchised because the worker can just apply for social security disability. Likewise, we frequently have problems on cases with doctors advising injured workers to just put their injury on medicaid so that the doctor can avoid all the pre-authorization hassles that comes with workers compensation.

One problem is the race to the bottom that impacts all injured workers. The public’s attitude is “As long as it doesn’t affect me, I don’t care. Out of sight, out of mind.” But this report confirms that it does affect the public. When the system finally breaks, remember that.

In 1991, Texas employers sought policy writers to create polices covering employees injured on the job. To fuel this need, the Texas legislature created the Texas Workers’ Compensation Insurance Fund, the largest writer of workers’ compensation insurance. In 2001, the state changed the fund’s name to Texas Mutual Insurance Company (TMIC) but maintained the same goal: to stabilize the state’s workers’ compensation system. Since its creation, TMIC has accomplished just that, consuming 40% of Texas’s workers’ compensation insurance market. Today, TMIC insures over 60,000 employers and their 1.4 million employees. Despite its success, TMIC recently announced its desire to cut ties with the state. The purpose of this blog is to explain some of the pros and cons associated with converting the state fund into a private company.

Continue Reading Texas Fights over State-Created Firm, Texas Mutual Insurance Company

On October 20, 2014, Texas’s Division of Workers’ Compensation (DWC) announced final disciplinary actions against insurance carriers, health care providers, and employers for violating the state’s workers’ compensation laws. Division of Workers’ Compensation Announces Recent Enforcement Action, Tex. Dep’t Ins. (Oct. 20, 2014), available at http://www.tdi.texas.gov/news/2014/dwc—10—20.html.

Since January 1, 2014, administrative penalties for these violations total $1,774,345, including $1,658,245 against insurance carriers, $65,600 against health care providers, and $1,000 against employers.

Continue Reading TX DWC Announces September Workers’ Compensation Violations

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

According to a recent study performed by Associated Press, traffic fatalities in drilling states, including Texas, have more than quadrupled since 2004. But wait . . . hasn’t the energy boom positively impacted our country? The increased production of oil and natural gas creates job, lifts local economies, and attracts manufacturers to the United States. However, our nation’s booming economy comes with a price—a spike in traffic facilities. Large trucks and heaving drilling equipment consume the streets of Texas drilling counties, increasing traffic fatalities by 18%.

 

Continue Reading Calling all Frackcident Victims: The Economic Benefits of Fracking do not Justify your Injuries